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What does "recht gegen recht" mean?

"Recht gegen recht" is a German phrase that translates to "right against right" in English. It refers to a situation where two par...

"Recht gegen recht" is a German phrase that translates to "right against right" in English. It refers to a situation where two parties both have legitimate claims or rights that conflict with each other, making it difficult to determine a clear solution or outcome. In such cases, it may be necessary to find a compromise or resolution that takes into account the interests of both parties.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

Keywords: Justice Conflict Law Opposition Balance Equality Duality Paradox Confrontation Resolution

Do you write recht or Recht?

I write "Recht" with a capital "R" because it is a proper noun in German. In German, proper nouns are always capitalized, so "Rech...

I write "Recht" with a capital "R" because it is a proper noun in German. In German, proper nouns are always capitalized, so "Recht" should be written with a capital letter.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does the word "Fug" mean in the expression "mit Fug und Recht"?

The word "Fug" in the expression "mit Fug und Recht" means "right" or "justly." When used in this context, it signifies that somet...

The word "Fug" in the expression "mit Fug und Recht" means "right" or "justly." When used in this context, it signifies that something is done or justified in a proper and legitimate manner. Therefore, the expression "mit Fug und Recht" can be translated to "with good reason and right."

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does the term "soziale Waise" mean?

The term "soziale Waise" translates to "social orphan" in English. It refers to a child who has been abandoned, neglected, or orph...

The term "soziale Waise" translates to "social orphan" in English. It refers to a child who has been abandoned, neglected, or orphaned by their parents, but is not necessarily without any living relatives. This term is often used in the context of social welfare and child protection to describe children who are in need of care and support due to their vulnerable situation.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does "recht" mean?

"Recht" is a German word that can have several meanings depending on the context. It can mean "right" as in the opposite of left,...

"Recht" is a German word that can have several meanings depending on the context. It can mean "right" as in the opposite of left, or it can mean "correct" or "proper." Additionally, it can also mean "law" or "justice" in a legal context.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

Keywords: Law Right Justice Correct Fair Entitlement Privilege Legitimate Lawful Authority

What does "totes Recht" mean?

"Totes Recht" is a German expression that translates to "totally right" or "completely correct" in English. It is used to express...

"Totes Recht" is a German expression that translates to "totally right" or "completely correct" in English. It is used to express agreement or approval with something that has been said or done. The phrase is often used in a casual or informal context to show enthusiastic agreement.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does "hier recht" mean here?

"Hier recht" in this context means "right here" or "here exactly." It is used to emphasize the location or position of something....

"Hier recht" in this context means "right here" or "here exactly." It is used to emphasize the location or position of something. In the given context, it is used to emphasize the specific location where the person is standing and observing the situation.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does "das Recht bleibt unberührt" mean?

"Das Recht bleibt unberührt" is a German phrase that translates to "rights remain unaffected" in English. This phrase is often use...

"Das Recht bleibt unberührt" is a German phrase that translates to "rights remain unaffected" in English. This phrase is often used in legal contexts to indicate that despite certain actions or circumstances, the legal rights of individuals or entities involved will not be impacted or changed. It serves as a declaration that existing rights will be upheld and respected regardless of the situation at hand.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

Keywords: Untouched Legal Remains Unaffected Intact Unaltered Unchanged Unscathed Uninfluenced Unaffected

What is the difference between "auf der Arbeit" and "bei der Arbeit"?

"Auf der Arbeit" typically refers to being physically present at one's workplace, while "bei der Arbeit" is more commonly used to...

"Auf der Arbeit" typically refers to being physically present at one's workplace, while "bei der Arbeit" is more commonly used to describe actively working or being engaged in tasks while at work. "Auf der Arbeit" focuses on the location, while "bei der Arbeit" emphasizes the action or state of being occupied with work-related activities. Both phrases are used interchangeably in casual conversation, but the subtle difference lies in the emphasis on either the physical location or the work being done.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

Keywords: Location German Preposition Work At On In Difference Usage Context

What is the correct wording: "von der Arbeit" or "aus der Arbeit"?

The correct wording is "von der Arbeit." This phrase translates to "from work" and is used to indicate that someone is coming from...

The correct wording is "von der Arbeit." This phrase translates to "from work" and is used to indicate that someone is coming from their place of employment. "Aus der Arbeit" would be translated as "out of work" and is not typically used to describe leaving one's job.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does "Arbeit lüge" mean?

"Arbeit lüge" is a German phrase that translates to "work lie" in English. It is often used to convey the idea that the concept of...

"Arbeit lüge" is a German phrase that translates to "work lie" in English. It is often used to convey the idea that the concept of hard work leading to success is not always true or fair. The phrase suggests that hard work alone does not guarantee success, and that there are other factors at play in achieving success. It can also be interpreted as a critique of the idea that hard work is always rewarded in society.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

What does the teacher mean by "schon recht ordentlich"?

The phrase "schon recht ordentlich" can be translated to "quite neat" or "fairly tidy" in English. The teacher likely means that t...

The phrase "schon recht ordentlich" can be translated to "quite neat" or "fairly tidy" in English. The teacher likely means that the work or effort being referred to is satisfactory or acceptable, but perhaps not exceptional. It suggests that there is room for improvement, but overall the work is decent.

Source: AI generated from FAQ.net

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